The new Tech Nation 2018 report signals positive changes for diversity in the tech sector in some areas, with more still to be done.

Tech Nation 2018 reveals that the digital tech sector’s workforce is older than commonly perceived and more ethnically mixed than the average UK workplace.

Figures from the report show that diversity in digital tech is on an improving trend with more black, Asian and ethnic minority workers employed in tech than across the UK in general at 15 per cent compared to 10 per cent.

On average 72 per cent of UK digital tech workers are also over 35, challenging the stereotype that jobs in this sector are the preserve of millennials.

However the dearth of women in the digital tech sector remains a factor, albeit one that is beginning to be addressed by activities to tackle the recruitment and retention of women.

Only 19 per cent of the digital tech workforce is female, compared to 49 per cent across all UK jobs.

The report’s finding suggest that although positive steps are being made, more must be done to continue to create diverse workforces, pulling in workers from all walks of life to plug the digital skills gap and provide equal opportunities with a wide-ranging group of role models for the next generation.

Sherry Coutu, chairman of the Scaleup Institute & Founders4schools said: “The Tech Nation report underlines the great things that are already happening in UK digital tech but as the pace of change quickens we must also build skills and diversity in our tech companies so that we can react to a changing global landscape.”

However there are some female founders who have found the UK is a positive place to start a business.

READ MORE: 101 FEMALE FOUNDERS IN TECH LIST

Cherry Freeman, co-founder, LoveCrafts said: “The UK’s ecosystem offers so many advantages to a determined entrepreneur like me.

“When I look around me and see the other businesses that are rapidly growing into international companies I’m inspired to carry on creating a company that can make a meaningful difference to the daily lives of everyone in urban areas, both here in the UK and around the world.”