These days, people of all ages think nothing of turning to technology when looking for love – or seeking a bit of fun.

An online dating industry dominated by websites exploded when mobile apps such as Tinder streamlined the process by using data from Facebook profiles or location, for example, and provided the service for free.

Most apps feature a ‘unique’ hook: on Tinder, users swipe left or right when looking at a photo of a potential match to denote whether they are interested or not; Grindr is used mostly by the gay and bisexual community; and Plenty of Fish has a mature user base with an average age of 44.

But with 1,400 dating apps in the UK alone, the choice for would-be Romeos and Juliets has never been greater – or more overwhelming.

That is where disrupter Queek'd, based in Manchester, comes in.

Queek'dQueek'd
The website

Founder Elisa Mclean hit upon the idea of using technology to advise people on the most suitable dating platform for them by asking them seven basic questions.

“Before Queek’d, there was no way of finding the right dating site without looking at articles, ads or referrals from friends,” she told a BusinessCloud breakfast event in disruption.

“We’ve designed a fun quiz which is quite engaging. One question is: ‘what type of single are you looking for?’

“The answer could be a professional, a Christian or a farmer.”

BusinessCloudBusinessCloud
Our 'Meet the Disrupters' event

She was inspired to help others find love after discovering that a match wasn’t quite who he said he was when they met up.

“He was chatting away, quite blasé, and I was thinking ‘you’re not him’.

“His profile picture looked great. The problem was that it showed him ten years younger – and tanned!”

BusinessCloudBusinessCloud
Elisa on stage with Watch This Space founder Michelle Rothwell

Queek’d focuses on people looking for long-term love rather than casual relationships and offers dating advice as part of the package.

“When you are casually dating you have a different mindset to when you are looking for a long-term relationship,” is Mclean’s view.

“It adds real value to my business, and sits better with me, to focus on long-term relationships.

“Some companies focus solely on profit and not on the success of users.

“It’s a bit of a minefield – if you speak to anyone about their experiences, they aren’t having much success.”