Too many companies are taking shortcuts on security measures which place their business at risk due to coronavirus.

That is the view of cyber security expert James Stickland, CEO of authentication platform Veridium, after the COVID-19 outbreak forced millions of employees to work from home.

Phishing attacks have risen an unprecedented 667 per cent in the UK compared to February as malicious actors trick users via fake coronavirus alerts.

Stickland claims COVID-19 is now posing the largest cyber security threat the world has seen.

“What makes this situation so difficult are the timeframes. Where typical changes of this scale are planned, researched, deployed and tested over months and even years, the UK now has just weeks to overcome some very real problems,” he said.

“These circumstances, albeit challenging and worrying, indeed present a long-term opportunity for businesses to reassess their security strategies. Many companies are facing increasing scrutiny over their identity verification requirements, particularly video conferencing tools, which have exploded in popularity.

“At this current time, invoking business continuity must be prioritised.”

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He continued: “Software-based authentication that can be delivered remotely will be key to improving cybersecurity for home workers. Authentication measures that require passwords or PINs put pressure on already inundated or unavailable IT helpdesks through resets.

“More and more organisations are realising the benefits of taking a multi-factor biometric approach to security, which can efficiently safeguard sensitive employee and customer data whilst future-proofing their business.

“The way the world works will change after this – individuals and businesses will rethink their priorities. In the same way it takes a cyber-breach to invest in improving security, this pandemic will make a number of businesses overhaul their remote working strategies.

“It will be very interesting to see how the business and security world will change.”